Six medically backed treatments for depression – which make absolutely zero sense (part two!)

Earlier in the week, I published part one of this article – six medically backed treatments for depression which make absolutely zero sense. Here’s part two!

Warmth

According to a multiple studies, people suffering from severe depression found relief when their core body temperatures were raised. We’re not talking a fluffy blanket here, either: We’re talking a hardcore warm bath in temperatures reaching 104-degrees Fahrenheit. Incidentally, the more depressed someone was, the more likely they were to find relief, which could offer some hope for people who suffer from treatment-resistant depression.

Another study found that depressed individuals who had their body temperatures raised showed less depressive symptoms than those who had their body temperatures raised, but by a much lower amount. In other words, more heat made someone feel better. And the difference, according to the report’s write-up, was “dramatic” – not a word often used when describing depression treatment!

Does this mean warming up can cure all? No. Of course not. But it does show a promising potential cure, one that needs more study to be truly evaluated. But, there are more cures which are even more effective, such as….

Getting smashed in the head with an electro-magnet (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation)

Allow me to introduce you to Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, one of the goofiest (and potentially more effective) treatments for depression that there is.

Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) is a type of therapy used for treatment resistant depression. What is it? Well, here:

In a nutshell, it involves being tapped in the head thousands of times (as many as forty over a ten second period) by an electromagenet. The electromagnet is supposed to wack you in the head in a region which corresponds to your brain’s center for mood control. As a result, your depression is supposed to increase.

Yes, this sounds terrible and painful, but it’s not, at all. I actually had TMS and absolutely noticed an improvement – one that decreased six months later, but is still there. Depending on a variety of factors (your own depression, insurance and availability), it’s a significant commitment. I had about 35 sessions over a seven week period. You sit down, get strapped in (again, not as bad as it sounds) and the tapping begins. The magnet hits you about 40 times over a four second period, then it rests for twelve seconds, and the cycle repeats for twenty minutes. Let me emphasize this: THIS IS NOT PAINFUL. I fell asleep repeatedly and texted my way through the other sessions. It’s kind of annoying and does take a session or two to get used to. It is also a time commitment: While you can miss a day or two, you can’t go on vacation in the middle of the session and expect it to still be effective.

Does it work? Yes. It did for me and I’m not crazy (well, I mean, I am, but that’s besides the point): Studies have found TMS having a success rate as high is 58% in terms of lessening symptoms, while other studies found that as 75% of people who had TMS reported that the benefits lasted for at least over a year.

That being said, if you’re looking for a treatment which smacks you less, allow me to direct you to our final item on this list….

Meditation

Breathe in. Breathe out. Focus on your navel. Feel better.

Really.

Meditation has gained a ton of prominence in recent years, and rightfully so: For as little as ten minutes a day, it’s been shown to reduce stress, lengthen your attention span, reduce memory loss and improve sleep, among many other positive changes.

And that works with depression too? Yep.

The most effective type of meditation for beating depression is mindfulness meditation, which is a specific type of meditation in which you sit still, calm down, and focus your mind on the present moment.

In a recent study of people with mild depression, people who underwent mindfulness meditation showed reduced rates of developing full-blown depression when compared to a control group.

Of course, that’s not all. A massive, systematic review of 18,573 citations on mindfulness meditation  showed that mindfulness meditation was moderately effective in treating pain and anxiety.

How does this work? Probably more than just one way. But, according to Dr. John Denninger of the Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, Meditation trains the brain to achieve sustained focus, and to return to that focus when negative thinking, emotions, and physical sensations intrude — which happens a lot when you feel stressed and anxious,”

I mean, when you think about this, it makes perfect sense. Meditation can help you calm down, focus your mind and avoid negative thoughts. This isn’t a matter of just sitting still and being chill. Depression changes your way of thinking. Meditation can help make it right again.

What does peace feel like to you?

I’ve written before about my relatively desperate attempts to meditate. I phrase it that way because it seems like, no matter what happens, my efforts fade away. Then I’m reminded of how important meditation can be for depression at a later date. I start again, I start again, and the cycle continues.

The good news – well, at least for me – is that I am in a cycle now where I am actually meditating. While I haven’t noticed a change in thinking yet, I will say that I always feel better and more peaceful in the immediate aftermath of a meditation session. And, that sense of peace is what I want to discuss in this entry, because I had a genuinely interesting realization while meditating the other day.

The meditation I practice – which, from what I’ve read, is the best kind for a depressed or anxious person to engage in – is mindfulness meditation. It’s a little complicated to explain – mainly because I don’t understand it and I kinda suck at – but the basics is focusing on nothing – and, in so doing, improving your focus.

Like I said, I’m terrible at it. My mind moves at a million miles an hour and I can’t shut it off. That’s one of the many reasons I am meditating: To try to relax and improve my focus.

So, the other day, I’m meditating. I have been sticking with five minute sessions – YouTube videos – and doing so because if I do longer I fall asleep. Anyway, I’m almost done. That realization is met with a degree of happiness and sadness. Happiness because I can get back to work. Sadness because I am at peace. And then I realize something: I’m at peace. Meditating is nice, and when I can actually concentrate enough to do it right, it fills me with peace.

That, then, triggers a question: What does peace feel like to me? There’s an easy answer, too: A fullness. A fullness in my chest which crowds out any negative feelings.

So, here’s my suggestion: Find what peace feels like to you. Because if you do, you can recognize the feeling when you actually experience it. And maybe, from there, learn how to keep it with you, even if it’s only just an extra moment or two.

Anyway, that’s something to think about: What does peace feel like to you? Let us know in the comments below!

Depression and meditation

Ugh, just writing this article makes me a little depressed. Why? Well, cause I can’t stick with this. No matter how hard I try, I absolutely, positively cannot stick with meditation – and that’s despite the evidence I’m about to write about below.

The studies are clear and I have written about the subject before: Meditation helps with depression. According to one study published in The Lancet, meditation may be as useful as anti-depressants at keeping depression at bay (side note: Damnit! I really need to look at this again!). This study noted the benefit of mindfulness meditation, which is a specific type of meditation.

What is mindfulness meditation? Mindful.org describes it simply: “Take a good seat, pay attention to the breath, and when your attention wanders, return. By following these simple steps, you can get to know yourself up close and personal.”

Want to know more? I found a few interesting resources on the subject. First, there’s this, from Headpsace, a meditation app I’ve used before. The article details the struggles of a very depressed man who tries meditation in a desperate attempt to get some relief and how meditation changes the way he thinks. The Washington Post ran a similar story earlier in the year, in which the author discusses how the Headspace app (this isn’t a sponsored post, I swear) helped them relearn their thinking.

Want more info on the research behind meditation? Check out this article on Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy, which is a specific type of meditation designed to help those with depression.

If you’re interested in more information on how meditation may help people with anxiety and depression, look at this pretty fascinating article from Harvard, which details specifically how depression can physically change your brain.

I will say this: As I’ve bitterly noted repeatedly, there have been many instances where I have actually meditated with some regularity, only to stop after some period of time. But, during those times, I did notice some changes about the way I was thinking. Specifically, I found myself focusing less often on anger, frustration and bitterness. I found myself better able to let things go, and it felt great. Sadly, inevitably, a busy life caught up with me, and I let the practice fall away.

Time to try again!

As always, I conclude with a question: What has been your experience with meditation? Have you practiced it – or do you practice it – on a regular basis? Notice any changes that you want to share with us? Please tell us your story in the comments below!

Things you CAN do to fight depression and anxiety

I think that one of the worst things that I’ve found in dealing with depression is the hopelessness that comes with it.  One minute you’re fine, and the next, you’re…not.  Medication and therapy help, but depression is a chronic condition.  It comes back.  And while you can limit it, manage it…it still comes back, and sometimes worse than others.

I’ve said it a million times and I’ll say it again: Professional guidance, and a controlled regimen of therapy and medication, can make all the difference in the world.  When it comes to chronic mental illness, the evidence is clear: Treatment works.

But, treatment doesn’t just mean that you rely on medication and/or therapy to get better.  To some extent, and I’ve certainly found this in my own life, you have to take control of your own illness.  Yes, you may be a victim of a bad roll of the dice, but no one need be depression’s victim.  There are things you can do, on your own, to help keep depression away (again, please note, NOT advocating any of the below in place of therapy, medication or any other professional advice that a licensed medical professional gives you…can’t emphasize that enough).  Here are a few tips that worked for me, and can hopefully work for you.

Exercise

Here’s a good one with a ton of benefits: Exercise can make a huge, positive difference when it comes to depression.  According to the Mayo Clinic, it does so by releasing “feel-good” chemicals, reducing immune system chemicals that can make depression worse and by increasing your body temperature.  Better yet, any physical activity can be helpful, so fear not!  You don’t have to launch yourself into a massive weight lifting program.

On a personal level, I’ve found the gym to be a savior.  Not only does it help you get in shape, feel better and look better, but it makes you feel like you are accomplishing something.  All too often, when you are depressed, you want to just lie around and Netflix & Sad.  You become depression’s bitch, and that is exactly the time to get up and force yourself to move around.  It takes a lot of hard work to overcome this natural inclination to slug-out on the couch, but it is well, well worth it.

Meditation

The evidence is clear: Meditation can help to ease the symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress.  It doesn’t have to be long – the article I link to says 2.5 hours a week – but, a bit of meditation goes a long way.  What I found somewhat interesting here was that most articles relating to depression and meditation don’t just discuss meditation, but a specific type of meditation – mindfullness meditation.  This specific type of meditation is defined as “a technique of meditation in which distracting thoughts and feelings are not ignored but are rather acknowledged and observed nonjudgmentally as they arise to create a detachment from them and gain insight and awareness.”

What is remarkable is that at least one study found that meditation “helped prevent depression recurrence as effectively as maintenance antidepressant medication did.”

Okay, I’ve resisted this all my life.  Not “resisted,” really…just, haven’t allowed myself to do it. I’ve come up with excuses, I’ve done it for a few days, I’ve stopped and started and just haven’t been able to sit down and meditate.  This blog entry has convinced me…again…of how important meditation can be for depression!  Must.  Do.  It.

Also, try the app Headspace.  I’ve used it a couple of times and it seems interesting.

Practice good sleep hygiene

Sleep hygiene?  It’s exactly what it sounds like – using healthy practices to help you get some real rest.  Sleep and depression have a complex relationship – a lack of sleep can lead to depression, and depression can lead to a lack of sleep, which makes getting a good night’s sleep all the more important.  Good sleep hygiene includes:

  • Limiting naps.
  • Not drinking caffeine too close to bed.
  • Limiting screen time too close to bed.
  • Having enough exposure to natural light (huh, didn’t know that).
  • Having a set sleep and wake-up routine.

During some of the particularly rough periods of my depression, I had a REAL hard time sleeping.  It was the canary in the coal mine of my symptoms – I couldn’t sleep, and suddenly, there I was again.  Sleep hygiene – particularly the routine and screen time part (which I still really need to work on!) – is vitally important, at least to me.

Video Games

I discussed this the other day, but felt it was worth repeating: Video games can help with depression.  First, the basics: There are studies which show that MMORPG and other social games can help reduce social anxiety, while puzzlers can reduce stress and anxiety levels.  Other apps and video games have also been found to reduce levels of depression.

Of course, video games can have serious negative drawbacks.  There is, unfortunately, ample evidence that some are not working and are instead playing video games, and there are real fears that mental health plays a role in this.  Video games provide an immersive escape, where there is no judgement, no consequences, and no real failure that cannot be eradicated by reloading the last save file.  This, of course, is dangerous when it comes to entering and remaining in the real world.

As I said earlier in the week, I’m a believer that video games can be great – if used in moderation.  They provide a nice retreat when necessary and can recharge your batteries – getting you ready to relaunch into the real world.

Anything you want to add?  What works best for you?  Let us know in the comments!