Five years public: A reflection and a request

It’s Sunday evening as I type this, and it is a beautiful night. And, as Facebook was kind enough to remind me, it’s also a sad anniversary: Today, five years ago, we lost Robin Williams to suicide.

William’s suicide inspired a slew of memorials, sadness and outpourings of grief. It also reinvigorated a conversation about mental illness in American society that desperately needed to happen – and now, needs to continue. Williams had always struggled with mental illness and addiction, and had always been very open about his pain. Now, the extent of his demons were laid bare for all to see.

I was letting my dog out in the backyard when my wife texted me the news of William’s death and suicide. And it hit me hard. As I’ve said repeatedly, if a man like Robin William’s could lose his battle, what hope did I have?

Then, while scrolling through a Facebook status, this comment, from someone I defriended on the spot: “So sad Robin Williams committed suicide. He just needed more faith in Jesus!”

That comment crystallized it for me: People really were this dumb about mental illness.

And that resulted in this Op-Ed in the Allentown Morning Call, by State Representative Mike Schlossberg: Reflections on a Personal Journey with Depression.

From the op-ed, words I had never said publicly before:

It was October 2001 when I began my journey with depression. A freshman at Muhlenberg College, I had been sad before, but never like this. It was a hopelessness that felt like a black cloud smothering everything I did.

It felt like my future was a wall — that there would never be any brighter days. I didn’t know I was suffering from depression at the time, but I do remember I couldn’t see any hope. The words of friends and parents were largely irrelevant, and I didn’t understand how I would ever feel OK again. After suffering through that blackness for many weeks and months, I began to contemplate if suicide wasn’t the better option.

Monday’s tragic suicide of Robin Williams has left millions of Americans baffled. How could a man of such talent, humor and power choose to end his own life? The sad and tragic truth is that mental illness, depression and suicide know no boundaries.

My path to recovery began with Rick at the Muhlenberg College counseling center, who helped teach me how to change my thinking, cope with the stress of a new school and how to deal with a breakup with my girlfriend from New Jersey.

When it became clear words weren’t enough and the anxiety attacks began getting stronger, he recommended me to a psychiatrist, who put me on an anti-depressant and anti-anxiety pill, which I still take to this day. I type these words without any shame. Why would I be ashamed? Are any of you embarrassed to be taking Lipitor for your cholesterol or Prilosec for your heartburn?

My point is this: Millions of Americans suffer from mental illness, and millions recover. There is no shame in saying you are depressed, you are anxious, and you need help.

There are many real tragedies which flowed from Robin Williams’ death. First and foremost is the human one: A husband, father, artist and inspiration left us way too soon. But it can’t be forgotten that William’s death likely caused others to end their lives as well, as a direct result of the suicide contagion effect. One study attributed as many as potentially 2,000 suicides to William’s public suicide. This heaps unmitigated pain on a nightmare.

What studies like this don’t quantify is how many others, like me, chose to go public in the aftermath of William’s suicide. I was one of many, many people to do so – and I can’t imagine the collective, positive impact that all of us combined have made. Nothing occurs in isolation. My struggle and the hope that I hope I was able to inspire only came from William’s suicide.

So today, on this important five year anniversary for me, a request: Share your story, share your pain. It doesn’t require an op-ed or a Facebook status. But relieve yourself of the secret shame which may be surrounding you. It doesn’t have to be bottled up. If my experience as a public official has shown anything to me, it’s that the general public is much more understanding than I ever would have anticipated. Telling my story has improved my life in a million different ways, and many of them deeply personal.

Tell your story. Tell it loudly, proudly and publicly. Be part of the moment which saves someone else.

 

How mass shootings affect (everyone else’s) mental health

It’s Sunday morning as I type this, the day after a bloody day in America. Unless you live under a rock, you know why.

20 dead in El Paso, Texas.

9 dead in Dayton, Ohio.

The elected official in me – indeed, the human – is outraged. 29 dead YESTERDAY ALONE in mass shootings because America refuses, collectively, to take the policy steps necessary to deal with these tragedies. To act on responsible violence-protection measures which could stop this bloodshed. To condemn white supremacy as a society and rid ourselves of it, root and branch. To adequately fund mental health initiatives which could save lives.

Our cowardice will condemn us all.

Alright. That’s not even the rage-fueled reason I’m writing today, although Lord knows that I could go on for hours about it, and that people much smarter and eloquent than me can and are doing the same. The reason I’m writing today was inspired by this tweet:

Two thoughts: First, this is beyond awful. Second, yes. How many of us have had similar thoughts? You’re just at the mall with family and friends, having a grand old time, and suddenly brought out of your pleasant state by wondering, “Hey, if there’s a shooting, what do I do?”

These thoughts are disturbing, intrusive, unpleasant, and slightly necessary. While the odds of any of us actual being involved in a mass shooting remain low (despite the rise in recent years), the possibility always exists, and it makes sense for all of us to be prepared and aware of the potential danger.

But society has now evolved to the point where, to an extent, we are all wondering about mass shootings. Every time I drop my kids off at school, I wonder about it. It’s in the back of my head, and depending on world events or my mood, it may be front and center. How many of you feel the same?

I would never claim that the pain of any of us not involved in a shooting like this is anywhere near the trauma of someone who was directly involved, so please don’t misunderstand. But, the elected official in me wants to make sure that we are clear about the damage that guns are doing to ALL OF US in society, and that they have changed the way we live in America to a constant state of fear and, as the tweet above puts it, a “low level anxiety.”

I can think of at least two broad and real examples. First, to those of us who are already prone to anxiety/stress and already likely thinking the worst, it gets your guard upon a near constant, low-level basis. It gives you a very real fear to focus on, and that, in turn, can pull you out of a sense of joy or relaxation you are feeling.

Second, and I’d say more damaging, is the impact these mass shootings has on kids. I was speaking with a group of guidance counselors a few weeks ago, and they were telling me how many students they speak with – on a regular basis – who are terrified that they will become a victim of a mass shooting. Again, as bad as things are in America, the odds of that happening are still low. However, the rise in shootings, the nature of our interconnected world and the ubiquity of technology magnify the odds of this occurring. This is particularly true for children or teenagers who don’t have the skills to know that the odds of this happening are still relatively slim. As a result, kids are scared to go to public, safe places – and this includes schools. What kind of damage will this have on them as they grow? As they attempt to learn or find safety and comfort?

We don’t have to live this way. And if we’re ever going to find the courage to actually not live this way, we have to acknowledge the impacts which gun violence has on every member of society, beyond those who are directly effected. The touches everyone of us.

 

Does hypnosis help – long term – with depression and anxiety?

All of us who suffer are constantly on the lookout for alternative ways to cope with depression and anxiety. As I was putzing around on Facebook the other day, the thought occurred to me: Is hypnosis one of those methods?

I’ve written in the past about the benefits of trying to relax throughout the day. One such way I’ve done so is by listening to ASMR videos, even if they are just running in the background. I’ve also always found guided relaxation videos/tapes to be very calming, and again, that sort of inspired this particular entry for me.

First, let’s review what hypnosis is, and what it isn’t. Hypnosis will not make you cluck like a chicken. It will not train you to become an assassin. It will not make you do anything you don’t want to do.

Hypnosis – true hypnosis, not the exaggerated, movie kind – is defined as heightened concentration, focus and openness to suggestions. While it is often associated with going into a state of deep relaxation, it is not to be confused with going into a coma-like state. Hypnosis patients are fully aware of what is going on, they are just put into a more relaxed state.

I did a little bit of digging about the available research when it comes to depression, anxiety and hypnosis. Healthline refers to hypnosis as a “complimentary therapy” which can be used to treat depression with minimal side effects, but cautions that it shouldn’t be the only type of therapy which a person uses. WebMD does the same, while noting that hypnotherapy can be used for the purposes of suggesting new (and more productive behaviors) or analyzing past traumas. However, both pages noted that hypnotherapy can be associated with the process of implanting false memories – as such, it should be avoided by people who may be sustainable to those, like individuals who suffer from dissociative disorders. Meanwhile, the Anxiety and Depression Association of America goes more in-depth in terms of how hypnosis can compliment cognitive behavioral therapy, describing how hypnosis can be used to generate images about what someone wants or needs.

In terms of specific research, I found a couple of papers. One 2010 study noted that there was a relative “dearth” of actual research on hypnosis’ effect on depression and anxiety, but that it was easy to imagine, conceptually, how hypnosis could be helpful for these disorders. Most interesting is a 2016 study, which made the rather startling claim that hypnotherapy was actually more effective than Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. That’s…interesting. It’s a finding that I’d argue would have to be replicated in order to be believed, but that’s quite the claim!

If nothing else, again – I think hypnotherapy can be deeply relaxing. Guided imagery (a process similar to hypnotherapy) can be effective for relaxing and for stopping anxiety attacks in their tracks. Heck, I remember my therapist once designing a guided imagery recording for me. So yeah, I think hypnotherapy can be useful – when done by a licensed therapist and in conjunction with any other medical professional you may have.

What about you – any experiences with hypnotherapy, positive or negative? Let us know in the comments!

 

What is “depression fog,” and what can you do about it?

If you suffer from depression, you probably read the world “depression fog,” and instantly went, “Yep, I gotcha.” Depression fog is one of the many, many lousy symptoms of depression.

For the unaware, imagine the way a migraine scrambles your brain, or a hangover. It’s basically that: Cognitive dysfunction caused by your mood. Depression fog – or “brain fog” – alters your ability to think and function. It can alter a slew of cognitive and physical functions, including critical thinking, reaction time, memory and more.

You just feel sleepy. Like you just woke up.

As noted by the above Healthline article, depression fog can make it hard for you to pay attention to things. You can’t remember things as well as you normally can. You have trouble concentrating and always feel tired.

I’d add a component of depression fog which I don’t think is adequately covered in the reading that I did on the subject: Guilt. When you can’t function as well as you wish you were, you often berate yourself: “Why aren’t I thinking right? God, why do I suck so badly?!?!” And then you get more depressed…and then the brain fog gets worse…and the spiral continues.

How do you get past the fog? In my experience, this is difficult to do without treating the underlying depression. For me, on the instances when the fog has descended, I’ve felt better as my mood has improved. The two are unquestionably linked. However, there are some treatment options which specifically address brain fog. For example, according to the above Healthline article, a recent study found that the drug Modafinil can be effective at treating cognitive dysfunction.

Other treatments, again, are the same as ones which you use to manage depression and your physical health: Get enough sleep, eat well, get exercise, etc.

I’d add two things: Go easy or go hard.

Again, this is just me talking here, so take everything I am about to say with an entire shaker of salt. But when I’m down, I sometimes just crave my bed. That can be a really good thing, or a really terrible thing. I mean, on one hand, going easy on yourself can be deeply therapeutic, but it can also inspire a ton of guilt and inadequacy. I suppose that part depends on your mood or chemistry. And I have to say – I always get scared when it comes to going easy on myself. I’m always so worried that if I just lie down in bed I will never, ever want to get out of it.

Everyone has their own brain chemistry, wants and needs. So, to that end, I’d make two suggestions. First, if you think that you can chill in bed without hating yourself, do it. Relax. Read a good book. Watch a good movie. Rest up, and then see how your mind is functioning.

Or, if you’re like me, tell your body: “No. I will not surrender to this. I’m going hard” – and then drag your butt to the gym. And fee proud of yourself afterwards.

My two cents, but as always, I’d love to hear yours. How do you fight the brain fog? Let us know in the comments below!

 

The importance of the human touch to prevent suicides

I wanted to talk a little more today about a study which – if the findings are replicatable – could go a long way towards proving that the best way to prevent suicide may be simply showing that you are someone who cares.

The study itself took place in Australia and was run by Dr. Gregory Carter of the University of Newcastle. Carter and his team sent suicide-attempt survivors a postcard eight times over a 12 month period.

The postcard didn’t say much, and it wasn’t fancy. On the front, it had a cartoon dog with a letter in its mouth. On the back was this message: “Dear X, It has been a short time since you were here at the Newcastle Mater Hospital and we hope things are going well for you. If you wish to drop us a note we would be happy to hear from you.” the card also had contact information for two doctors and the hospital.

The results? The group who received the card showed a 54% reduction in future suicide attempts, but the effort worked only for women.

Intuitively, this makes sense, of course. It’s no surprise that social contact and relationships are a preventative factor when it comes to suicides. And showing someone that you care can, of course, make a huge difference. How many times have you heard of a case where someone came back from the edge simply because there was one person who cared deeply about them?

This isn’t a silver bullet, of course. But it does reiterate a basic and sensible human truth: We can pull people back from the edge if we just show them that they care, that they matter, and that there are ways to get help if they are feeling down.

I’d also argue that this shows that all of us have a role to play when it comes to suicide prevention and helping people get through their darkest moments. To be clear, again, none of us are responsible for someone who ends their own life – but all of us can be part of a solution. Care for each other. Follow up with friends who are showing warning signs of depression or suicide. Ask if they are okay. You don’t have to have the solution. But just being a caring human can, apparently, go a long way towards preventing someone from taking their own life.

 

Oregon students can now take mental health days

So, in my political world, I’m a pretty progressive guy. One of the states which I have always watched closely has been Oregon. Oregon has been a progressive success story of epic proportions: From the environment to minimum wage increases to abortion rights to gun control to expanding economic opportunity to all residents, Oregon has led the way. 1

And then, I came across this story: Teens in Oregon can now take mental health days as an excused absence from school. It was done largely to address the stigma which surrounds mental health. According to Debbie Plotnik of Mental Health America:

“The first step to confront this crisis is to reduce the stigma around it. We need to say it’s just as OK to take care for mental health reasons as it is to care for a broken bone or a physical illness.”

The law specifically states that students can have up to five absences in a three month period – and anything more requires a written excuse to the principal.

In response to concerns that the law would make it easier for students to get out of school, Haily Hardcastle, one of the teenagers involved with the lobbying for the law, said, that students would take time off with or without the law – but the new law may encourage students to take their own mental heath more seriously, and would require schools to recognize mental health in their attendance policies.

Oregon’s rate of suicide is 40% higher than the rest of the nation.

I’m…I’m really intrigued by this. It does seem like a lot of days. And I wonder how this effort would interact with other attempts to remedy chronic absences – something that we really struggle with in my home school district of Allentown. But, I believe that Mrs. Hardcastle’s comments are correct – a kid is gonna take a day off if they want to, and if we can encourage them to discuss why, maybe we can help save their life.

Regardless, I’m extremely intrigued, and I’m hoping to pursue this one more. And if you have any feedback, I’d love to hear it!

 

Suicide is never “gotta set myself free” – a letter to Epic Rap Battles and a discussion on how we talk about suicide

Sunday entry instead of a Monday one, but it’s an important and timely one.

If you are a nerd like me, and you’ve spent any time on YouTube, chances are you have come across Epic Rap Battles of History. They are a YouTube channel which hosts rap battles between historical or celebrity figures. They lampoon everyone, and they are so, so clever and funny. I’ve always loved them and get excited when they publish a new video.

Early this morning, they premiered their latest battle between George Carlin and Richard Pryor. The battle, as usual, was hilarious. This one featured guest appearances be Joan Rivers and Robin Williams. Williams appears last, and it’s his last line which causes the problem:

Again, that last verse:

“I love the prince
but you’ll never have a friend like me
Thanks folks that’s my time
Gotta set myself free”

And Williams disappears into the top of the screen.

That last line is clearly a reference to William’s suicide in August 2014. And that line is a huge problem. Suicide should never, ever be discussed as a freeing option, one which somehow frees people from the bonds of pain and life. Suicide is not an option. Discussing it as a positive thing frames it in a positive way, and that encourages others to look at suicide as if it should be considered.

Some of you may remember that this isn’t the first time that William’s suicide was displayed this exact way, using the same language (which is a reference to both the suicide itself and Genie’s desire to be free in Aladdin). After William’s suicide, The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences put out this tweet:

The tweet was criticized by suicide prevention activists. It made suicide appear celebratory, a victory over depression and pain, and a viable option for anyone who hurts. This can never, ever be the case.

From the article:

  • Christine Moutier, chief medical officer at the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention: “If it doesn’t cross the line, it comes very, very close to it. Suicide should never be presented as an option. That’s a formula for potential contagion.”
  • Ged Flynn, chief executive of the charity Papyrus: I am particularly concerned that use of the ‘Genie, you’re free’ tweet could be seen as validation for vulnerable young people that suicide is an option.”
  • Jane Powell, director of the support group Calm, “We all want Robin to be in a happier place but it’s not a good message for people feeling suicidal, because we want them to stay with us and not go find some starry night escape with genies,” she said.

This is needed largely because suicide contagions are real: After William’s suicide, suicides increased by 10%. And, as the study I linked to notes, media coverage of suicide can be critical to how the coverage of suicide influences suicidiality in others. There are media recommendations for how to cover suicide (I actually tweeted it yesterday, before this video, in reference to an ongoing situation in my home region which thankfully ended well).

One of the key recommendations is not to glamorize suicide or present it as an option. The media has failed that before: Epic Rap Battles failed it here. Do I think they did this on purpose? No, absolutely not. I think it’s an honest mistake. But I hope it’s one they correct.

Again, here are the facts:

  • In 2017, over 47,000 Americans took their own life. These are the highest rates of suicide since World War 2.
  • Suicide is the 10th leading cause of death in the United States, and the 2nd leading cause of death for 10-24 year-olds.
  • Suicide rates have increased 33% since 1999.

We have an epidemic, or, in the words of Congersswoman Susan Wild (D-PA), a national emergency. National emergencies require being addressed on all fronts. One of those is cultural and communication. No one with a platform over over fourteen million subscribers should make such a casual reference to suicide and describe it as “gotta set myself free.” I’m hoping this was unintentional. And I hope that ERB will consider changing the video.

And to everyone else: Please watch how you discuss suicide. Please take it seriously. And please use person-first language which ensures that we let people know they are loved and cared for, and that we never, ever, ever want them to “set themselves free.”

The Spades Trilogy & Redemption: An Update!

One of the basic principles of blogging is to not be too self-promotional – say, promote yourself 1 out of every 10 entries. This webpage is hosted on “www.mikeschlossbergauthor.com” so it’s probably no surprise for you to hear that I’ve done this, in part, to help promote my book, Redemption.

That being said, I, err…forgot to promote the book on the blog. My bad.

For those of you who are unaware, I wrote a book! Redemption is a Young Adult, Mental Health, Science Fiction tale on depression, anxiety and saving the world:

Twenty young people wake aboard the spaceship Redemption with no memory how they got there.

Asher Maddox went to sleep a college dropout with clinical depression and anxiety. He wakes one hundred sixty years in the future to assume the role as captain aboard a spaceship he knows nothing about, with a crew as in the dark as he is.

Yanked from their everyday lives, the crew learns that Earth has been ravaged by the Spades virus – a deadly disease planted by aliens. They are tasked with obtaining the vaccine that will save humanity, while forced to hide from an unidentified, but highly advanced enemy.

Half a galaxy away from Earth, the crew sets out to complete the quest against impossible odds. As the enemy draws closer, they learn to run the ship despite their own flaws and rivalries. But they have another enemy . . . time. And it’s running out.

If you’re interested, go here for ordering info (including how to order a copy direct from me), or here to order off Amazon. You can also download the first chapter, absolutely free.

The book came out a year ago, so, let me give an update about what’s next!

The Trilogy

It is the Spades Trilogy, after all, so you may be wondering, where is Book Two?

Here’s the good news: It is actually written. So, yay! My publisher currently has it, and I’m hoping it will enter the editing process in the near future. It required some rewrites to make it a better product, so that slowed things down a bit, but appropriately so: I’d rather get something to you that’s really good than something that’s been done really quick.

I’m not sharing the title yet, but I will, I promise. I’ll say this: The original title was Reclamation. That got changed because it just sounded weird and didn’t work with the theme of the book. Also, my wife made fun of me, saying it wasn’t a real name.

When will it be published? That one I don’t have an answer for. It depends on how long the editing process takes. My guess – and this is just a guess – is at least a year.

And, for the record, Book Three is also written, and I should finish my edits on it within a month or so. So, yes, I know how the story ends. But that one is nowhere near ready for publication.

The writing process is a long one. The first book took four years, start to finish – although that was because I also had to get a book proposal ready and find a publisher. Hopefully 2 & 3 won’t be as long.

Writing about depression, anxiety, Spades, Ash, Alexis & the rest of the crew of the Redemption has been one of the more joyful experiences I’ve had professionally. I love what the book evolved into. It has given me a chance to attack mental illness in a completely new arena, and I have loved every second of it. And I can’t wait for the rest of the story to get share with the world.

4 Quick Tips to Break You Out Of Your Funk

My wife and I spent a lot of time this summer at the our local parks. We’re lucky – we live in Allentown, and we have this ridiculous park system. One of the closest to our house – and the largest – is Trexler Park, a gorgeous park with a lake, ample green space and a few paths. Every night last week, we’ve grabbed the kids and hopped down to Trexler. It’s been wonderful.

And I always feel better when we get back.

Look, one of the many problems with depression is that it totally locks you in. You do the same things because you simply do not have the time or mental energy to do anything else. That, of course, can only lead to more depression issues, and that’s something which you have to try and break if you’re ever going to make a recovery.

There are ways, however. The next time you feel stuck, consider doing any of these 5 activities.

Go to the park

Forget your troubles, try to forget everything. Go for a nice walk and lose yourself in nature.

Yes, this does help – and there’s research to prove it. It’s 8am on Sunday as I am writing this, and I just took the dog for a walk around my nearly deserted block. It felt so nice. The best way I can describe how I feel is more centered.

Volunteer at a nearby animal shelter

Our family just adopted a pupper again, and it’s been very nice so far. We took our time making the selection from the Lehigh County Humane Society, and one of the things which struck me when we were there was that they had a slew of volunteers walking in and out of that place, caring for the animals, taking them for walks, etc.

Look, puppies and kitties are more than just adorable: They help you fight depression. Combine that with the general mental health benefits of volunteering, and this one is well worth it. If you’re an animal person, go check out your local shelter and see what volunteer options there are.

Exercise

I’ve written about this one before so I am repeating myself, but exercise when you are depressed can be very beneficial, and again, there’s research to prove it. Depression is fundamentally biological, and exercise can change your biology and physiology, making you feel better.

Take care of yourself

When I think of myself in my most depressed state, it’s this: Covered in a hoodie, unshowered, hair uncombed and unshaven. Sound familiar? When you’re depressed, you lack the energy or mental strength to do even the most basic things, like take care of general hygiene. That, of course, is largely a mental trick, but it works both ways. Doing something small – even if it’s just brushing your teeth -can signal to your body that this is not where you want to be right now. So, to that end, when you’re down, make sure you take care of your body. Do the basics – shave and comb your hair. If you don’t think you have strength for that, try something small – take a warm shower. Try to fool your body into thinking you are okay – and then look the part.

These are four things which work for me and others, but they may not for you. What does work for you? Let us know in the comments!

 

An in-depth look at America’s suicide numbers

This Bloomberg story came out about two weeks ago and reviewed America’s rising suicide numbers. It’s findings, as you can imagine, are damning. Some of the salient points:

  • In 2017, 47,000 people died by suicide – and 1.4 million made attempts.
  • From 2000-2006, the suicide rate increased by 1% annually. From 2006-2016, that increased to 2%.
  • Life expectancy has fallen for three straight years – the first three consecutive year drop since 1915-1918.
  • Suicide is the 2nd leading cause of death for 10-34 year-olds.
  • Suicides cost U.S. businesses between $80-100 billion annually.
  • A lack of resources is to blame for many of these issues. According to some experts, the United States needs 50 mental health beds for every 100,000 people – but some states have numbers as low as 5 per 100,000.

The article goes on to say something I’ve discussed in the past – part of the intractability of our mental health and suicide crisis is the intertwined nature of the problems. Health care, genetics, finances, social support, culture – they all interact to influence mental health. As the article notes, combine that with a rapidly changing economy, advances in technology and a changing cultural scene, and you have a recipe for the disaster we’re currently experiencing.

Mental Health parity (reimbursing physical and behavioral health care at the same rates) and a lack of doctors play a role as well. As recent court cases have noted, many insurers still aren’t adequately reimbursing for mental health services, or they are resorting to alternative methods (such as steering patients to doctors who are no longer even in their network) in order to keep people out of treatment.

The story also noted that changing the way we gather data could lead to additional insights which may result in better treatment of mental health disorders: In 2010, England started measuring overall life satisfaction and recently created a “Minister of Loneliness.”

So, what’s the conclusion of this article? Besides “holy crap this is bad”?

I think I’m gonna be repeating myself a bit here. But the conclusion is that addressing suicide for real will require a huge investment of resources and an acknowledgement that it’s more than just mental health. We have to address insurance and fiscal policies. Create a culture which is more accepting of mental health challenges. Understand that the challenges of mental health are comprehensive ones which tie a variety of areas together.

And I think we have to be willing to pay. For care. For insurance access. For bed space in the event that there are emergencies.

I hated reading this article because it was painful. But we need to know the truth about mental illnesses. And the truth is that this problem will take a long, long time to fully address.