More Than Stigma: Shifting the Nature of the Conversation Around Mental Health and Suicide

Advocates for suicide prevention and mental health often talk broadly about “the stigma” which surrounds mental illness and suicide. Many of us – myself included – believe that if we can just get more people talking and thinking of mental illness, if we can have people discussing their issues with depression, anxiety, addiction and more without shame or fear, we can help to put an end to this epidemic. I firmly believe that this is the case.

I also know its not enough.

And that’s where the conversation around public policy, resources and taxation has to come into pay.

I happened to catch a fascinating column on mental health the other day – I obviously can’t find it now, that would be too easy, but the column made a great broad point: Ending mental health stigma is like cutting holes in a wall, but then there’s nowhere to go because our system of mental healthcare is so broken in this country.

Many of us concentrate our efforts on stigma for a couple of reasons. I think it’s one of the most important things that we can do. But let me expand on the second part of that sentence: That we can do. People do need to know it is okay to seek help and to treat themselves. They need to know that these issues are real, powerful and can kill you. But, as any studies have shown, individual conversations are the best way to break mental health stigma. A face to face talk can make a huge difference in that area. That means that, without question, the most important person to ending mental health stigma is you.

Second, it’s the easiest.

Making society-wide change is really hard, of course. Particularly in areas where colossal interest groups are at play. I’m an elected official – theoretically one of the people who makes state-wide decisions in Pennsylvania – and I fully understand just how difficult this can be.

And the simple truth is that we must make systemic changes to help reduce rates of mental illness and suicide.

From a mental health and suicide perspective, there’s an awful lot that needs to be done. This includes increasing access to mental health care, increasing the number of mental health care practitioners and addressing the mental health care practitioner shortage, reducing costs, enforcing parity in insurance care, reducing access to deadly means of suicide and more. And that’s to say nothing about the major societal problems that we face which contribute to mental illness and suicide, including improving housing options, strengthening the social safety net, increasing the minimum wage, making housing more affordable, etc.

Many of us tackle stigma because we can’t get at these issues. And stigma is something we can control.

So, what does that mean? Should you stop talking about mental health stigma? Hell no. Of course it’s vitally important, but it’s important in more ways than you think, because the more you discuss mental health, the more pressure you can bring on policy makers to address the fundamental inequities and gaps in our system which allow for mental illness to run so rampant. Keep fighting.

But make sure you fight in a public policy realm, in addition to addressing individual changes. Tell policy makers and elected officials that you expect them to do more to address rates of mental illness and reduce suicides. These issues require government intervention, and that requires public pressure. Please help make this happen.

 

Medication is Not Addiction: A response to a misinformed column

I spent way too much time on Sunday on Twitter, joining a chorus of voices who were yelling at David Lazarus, a columnist or the Los Angeles times. Lazarus wrote a column in which he discusses his own experience at trying to withdraw from anti-depressants. The title of the column? “Hi, I’m David. I’m a drug addict.”

Yep. Only went downhill from there.

Ironically, Lazarus discussed important issues like the over prescribing of medication, failure to adequately warn patients about side effects and discontinuation syndrome. These are real, important issues. They merit serious, thoughtful consideration. Instead, Lazarus decided to call millions of Americans (like me) drug addicts. He esoterically wondered “Who am I, really?” about taking anti-depressants. It’s a tragic, misguided view, one which reinforces stigma and will prevent people from getting help they need. And the language used by Lazarus is just appalling. If I’m a drug addict, so is everyone else who uses medication to survive for any other condition.

Really, this is just an ugly article.

I wrote a response which the Los Angeles Times did not accept, citing their policy to not run op-eds in response to other op-eds. Fair enough. My response, then, is below.

Don’t believe crap like what Lazarus decided to spew. Medication can be a vitally important part of any therapeutic regimen. It has saved thousands of lives.

Let’s say you are a diabetic and require insulin to live. One day, a friend tells you to quit insulin. Stunned, you ask why. Your friend responds: “Well, you can’t live without insulin. That makes you a drug addict.”

That’s absurd, right? Taking a prescribed medication in recommended doses doesn’t make you a drug addict. That makes you a responsible adult.

But the above scenario would never really happen, right? No one would ever claim that taking medication to treat diabetes, Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s would make you a drug addict.

But, apparently, such an understanding does not apply to the millions of Americans who take medication to manage mental illnesses. To Americans like me.

For eighteen years, I’ve been diagnosed with a major depressive and generalized anxiety disorder. I’ve been suicidal. The medication which I take, in conjunction with therapy and lifestyle changes, has saved my life.

About five years ago, I made the decision, as a Pennsylvania State Representative, to start discussing my battles with depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation. I did so in response to the stigma which surrounds mental illness. Depression isn’t a weakness. It can’t be willed away. Taking medication doesn’t say anything about one’s character any more than having heart disease indicates a moral failure.

That’s why I was so disheartened to read Mr. Lazarus’ column: It took serious issues like over-prescribing  and discontinuation syndrome – issues which deserve thoughtful, reflective discussion – and conflated them with drug addiction. To be sure, medication is not a panacea. It often takes months, if not years, to find appropriate medication and dosage. Prescribers sometimes fail to appropriately monitor their patients. Side effects are real and dangerous. All of these issues demand thoughtful consideration and conversation.

However, such problems exist in virtually all areas of medicine, and no one would reasonably or seriously suggest that we should stop prescribing scientifically proven medication to people in need. Yet, that is exactly what some suggest when it comes to mental health.

Mr. Lazarus refers to himself as a “drug addict” for taking anti-depressants. Yet, he also discusses being a diabetic who takes medication for chronic Type 1 diabetes. Strangely, he declines to refer to himself as a “drug addict” for requiring insulin to manage his blood sugar levels. I wonder why.

We should never, ever be so foolish as to conflate appropriate use of anti-depressants with drug addiction. To do so makes people who take anti-depressants to live sound like sound like a caricature of a drug addict, desperate for their next hit of smack…or, as I like to call it, the pills which help me not want to kill myself every morning.

Contrary to what some believe, anti-depressants are not happy pills which whisk you away on a cotton-candy cloud, carrying you to Lollipop Island to float with gumdrops all day long. What they do is help you control symptoms, improve your mood and make other forms of change – like psychological therapy and lifestyle changes – easier to obtain.

Taking medication for mental illness doesn’t change who you are. It allows you to be who you are.

Far too many Americans have ignored their own minds and medical advice, choosing to try and “tough out” spells of depression, to “man up” or ignore these painful and rehabilitating symptoms. Too many Americans have powerful fears that taking anti-depressants makes you weak. This stigma must be crushed and rebutted in the same way intelligent society has pushed back on those who attack vaccines.

Anti-vaxxers and those who deny the positive impact of anti-depressants are flip sides of the same coin: They seek to use pseudoscience and stigma. Science has given us incredible tools which can be used to our great physical and emotional benefit. To ignore those tools, or to somehow wrap their use in shame, serves only to pull us into a darkness which we should have left behind decades ago.

The nearly 1 in 5 Americans who suffer from mental illness – including me – deserve to have our challenges discussed with respect and a comprehensive understanding of mental health treatment options. This discussion is simply incomplete without discussing the importance, effectiveness and risks of medication. No one who takes an anti-depressant is a drug addict, any more than a person who takes Prilosec for heartburn is addicted to not having their chest feel like is on fire.

The facts are stark. Depression rates are skyrocketing, rising sharpest among today’s youth, who have seen nearly 50% increases in rates of depression. 47,000 Americans – and 2,000 in my home state of Pennsylvania – died by suicide last year, an increase of 34% since 1999.

We need serious, sober conversations about mental illness and how to treat it. There are many concerns with anti-depressants. These are valid, serious concerns which must be addressed. But these conversations must occur using words and arguments which shatter stigma and support science. To do otherwise does an incredible disservice to those of us who suffer.

 

The news isn’t completely terrible: 3 Reasons to be hopeful in our ongoing mental health crisis

I’ve written a lot about just how bad things are in the universe of mental health. Rates of depression and anxiety illness are rising, particularly among our youngest and college students, and suicide rates are hitting highs which haven’t been seen since World War II. This, of course, is terrible.

Still, life could be a lot worse when it comes to the mental health universe. Here are three reasons to be hopeful in the long-run.

Stigma is decreasing

According to multiple articles, the stigma which surrounds mental health is slow decreasing, but particularly for those who are younger. Many in a younger generation view seeking therapy and getting help as normal – as such, they don’t hesitate to do so. All of these articles note – correctly – that will still have a long way to go before we can consider stigma to be truly “defeated,” but it is worth noting and celebrating that significant progress has been made. Furthermore, the slew of celebrities who have openly discussed their own struggles has furthered humanized the issue and made others realize that suffering from mental illness doesn’t have to hold you back.

The Affordable Care Act is Helping People Get Treatment

The ACA – or Obamacare – has been subjected to no shortage of controversy. However, some things about it are indisputable. One such example is that more people are getting the mental health treatment that they need and deserve – and that they are getting better. ObamaCare required that all individual and small coverage plans offer mental health care, and that the coverage of mental health be similar to what it was for physical coverage. This alone has helped to increase the amount of plans which offer mental health care. The percentage of young people without health insurance dropped from roughly 22% (2013) to 13% (2016), and since young people were more likely to first experience a mental health challenge, this meant that more people had access to the care that they needed.

There’s more, of course. States which expanded Medicaid saw sharper decreases in mental illness than states which hadn’t, resulting in more care, more treatment and a lower financial burden.

There is no doubt: ObamaCcare has helped those with mental illness.

Social Media Has Tremendous Potential For Good

Alright, so I’ve been a bit harsh on social media in my time as a blogger in the mental health world. Just a bit. But it really isn’t all bad. Social media has the potential to be very helpful – and indeed, has been very good for mental illness…if used properly.

Social media, even if it’s just digital, can help promote a sense of connectedness. Sufferers of various mental illnesses can connect with more people and find the assistance that they so desperately need. If it’s users are mature enough, they can provide goals to aspire to and help to push creativity. By keeping users abreast of social opportunities and events, it can help maintain social relationships.

Indeed, for all of the negative press which social media has gotten on mental illness, there is at least one study (which examines adults, not just college or high school students) which shows that it can be positive and result in less psychological distress.

All kidding aside, I think social media can be good for metnal health…but requires literal mental training that I don’t think we possess as of yet. People have to use social media to supplement their social life, not supplant it. They need to recognize that it’s a curated form of life, not real life. And they need to remember that they have plenty of things to feel joyful and proud about, and to not feel jealous of what others put on their newsfeeds. That can be a real challenge, to say the least!

As always, I’d love to hear your thoughts. What else has been good news in the world of mental illness? Let us know in the comments below!

 

Does hypnosis help – long term – with depression and anxiety?

All of us who suffer are constantly on the lookout for alternative ways to cope with depression and anxiety. As I was putzing around on Facebook the other day, the thought occurred to me: Is hypnosis one of those methods?

I’ve written in the past about the benefits of trying to relax throughout the day. One such way I’ve done so is by listening to ASMR videos, even if they are just running in the background. I’ve also always found guided relaxation videos/tapes to be very calming, and again, that sort of inspired this particular entry for me.

First, let’s review what hypnosis is, and what it isn’t. Hypnosis will not make you cluck like a chicken. It will not train you to become an assassin. It will not make you do anything you don’t want to do.

Hypnosis – true hypnosis, not the exaggerated, movie kind – is defined as heightened concentration, focus and openness to suggestions. While it is often associated with going into a state of deep relaxation, it is not to be confused with going into a coma-like state. Hypnosis patients are fully aware of what is going on, they are just put into a more relaxed state.

I did a little bit of digging about the available research when it comes to depression, anxiety and hypnosis. Healthline refers to hypnosis as a “complimentary therapy” which can be used to treat depression with minimal side effects, but cautions that it shouldn’t be the only type of therapy which a person uses. WebMD does the same, while noting that hypnotherapy can be used for the purposes of suggesting new (and more productive behaviors) or analyzing past traumas. However, both pages noted that hypnotherapy can be associated with the process of implanting false memories – as such, it should be avoided by people who may be sustainable to those, like individuals who suffer from dissociative disorders. Meanwhile, the Anxiety and Depression Association of America goes more in-depth in terms of how hypnosis can compliment cognitive behavioral therapy, describing how hypnosis can be used to generate images about what someone wants or needs.

In terms of specific research, I found a couple of papers. One 2010 study noted that there was a relative “dearth” of actual research on hypnosis’ effect on depression and anxiety, but that it was easy to imagine, conceptually, how hypnosis could be helpful for these disorders. Most interesting is a 2016 study, which made the rather startling claim that hypnotherapy was actually more effective than Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. That’s…interesting. It’s a finding that I’d argue would have to be replicated in order to be believed, but that’s quite the claim!

If nothing else, again – I think hypnotherapy can be deeply relaxing. Guided imagery (a process similar to hypnotherapy) can be effective for relaxing and for stopping anxiety attacks in their tracks. Heck, I remember my therapist once designing a guided imagery recording for me. So yeah, I think hypnotherapy can be useful – when done by a licensed therapist and in conjunction with any other medical professional you may have.

What about you – any experiences with hypnotherapy, positive or negative? Let us know in the comments!

 

The disproportionally high levels of suicide among (some) minority groups

It’s been written repeatedly, and it’s true: One of the most likely demographic to die by suicide are middle aged, white men. But, as a recent report in USA Today helps illuminate, we shouldn’t confuse this reality with the notion that white men are the most at risk – or that other groups don’t need very real assistance.

USA Today’s story, which was published earlier in the week, came with this stark headline: Suicide Rate for Native American Women is up 139%. Native American and Alaska Natives have a suicide rate 3.5 times higher than the lowest group – an astonishingly high number.

The story highlights a very, very ugly truth: In mental health – just like in health care generally speaking, unfortunately – minority communities have it worse. But, in the case of suicides, not every minority community is this way. For example, suicide rates among African Americans and Pacific Islanders have increased, but remain roughly half the rate of suicides as whites, according to the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention:

suicideRatesByEthnicity.png

Meanwhile, according to the Suicide Prevention Resource Center, rates of suicides among Hispanics also remain far below the United States average, with Hispanics dying by suicide at a rate of slightly more than half of the rest of the United States population.

This is good news, of course, and a very rare bit of good news when it comes to health care for black and Hispanic communities. What drives these rates lower? There are many theories, primarily the idea that strong family and community support provide a degree of resilience not available in other cultures, as well as the idea that self esteem and religiosity rates are higher among African Americans.

All of these factors may tie into why other minority groups have higher rates of suicide. LGBT community members are three times more likely to die by suicide. On average, LGBT members as well as Native Americans, have lower levels of self esteem, community support and family bonds.

In total: The minority suicide rates are not what they would reflexively seem to be. That’s something for all of us to keep in mind as we deal with public policy and suicide.

Does CBD help with depression or anxiety?

In 2018, Donald Trump signed the Farm Bill into law. Among other things, this piece of legislation made legal much of the sale of CBD and hemp, as well as research into this area. – This opens up an array of new potential research, but CBD may have a positive impact on depression and anxiety.

What’s CBD, you ask? First, what it’s not: Marijuana. It is not marijuana. CBD is short for cannabinoid oil, and it became legal to be sold after the 2018 Farm Bill was signed into law.

Specifically, CBD is extracted from hemp plants. It works be manipulating your Endocannibinoid System, a part of your body which regulates a variety of bodily functions, including, potentially, your mood.

Here’s an important point though: While some research has been done, more research is DESPERATELY needed in order to determine CBDs usefulness, effectiveness, proper dosages, long-term impact, etc. At the moment, it is not widely regulated by the FDA, though the FDA has sent out cease and desist letters to some companies which have falsely marketed benefits yet to be proven by research.

Indeed, as of yet, there is no formal regulation when it comes to CBDs marketing or ensuring the quality of ingredients. For example, a 2017 Penn State study surveyed 81 CBD products and found that 70% were mislabeled. As such, if you’re going to purchase CBD, your best bet is to ensure that the label notes it has been independently tested. This means that a product has been evaluated by a 3rd party, and that 3rd party has determined that’s it’s labeling is accurate.

Okay. Enough about the legal disclaimers and warnings. What does the research show?

According to one 2014 study, CBD and Marijuana may show anti-depressant like effects. That finding was replicated in 2018, when a study showed that CBD has “anxiolytic, antipsychotic and neuroprotective properties” and may be useful in fighting a slew of problems, including PTSD and depression.

There’s additional research available, but it does seem clear: There’s opportunity here.

While CBD is not marijuana, and will not get you high like marijuana, some forms of CBD (namely Full Spectrum CBD) do contain trace amounts of marijuana. As such, if you ingest this type of CBD, you may feel some effects. Furthermore, it is possible for Full Spectrum CBD to show up on a drug test – so DON’T TAKE IT if that’s an issue for you.

Furthermore, you should not take any CBD product without consulting with your Doctor or medical professional first. While common side effects of CBD are relatively minor, there can be more problematic impacts for people with Parkinson’s, liver issues, or pregnant/nursing women.

Now that we’ve gotten the warnings out of the way: Is their potential for people with mental illness and CBD? I’d say yes. Anecdotal evidence and some research seems to indicate the potential for relief. Again, more research is needed. Again, don’t do anything without talking to a Doctor or medical professional first. But, yes. More research is now being conducted, this area does prove promising.

 

“Deaths of despair”

I wrote last week about how the particularly sharp rise in suicide and mental illness among our youngest is particularly alarming, arguing it doesn’t bode well for our society if our youngest are becoming so sick so young.

USA Today ran a related story last week about a similar topic, making an argument which has been made repeatedly – that the rise of mental illness, suicides and drug overdoses are all tied to the same basic cause – they are “deaths of despair.” From the article:

“Drug-related deaths among people 18 to 34 soared 108% between 2007 and 2017, while alcohol deaths were up 69% and suicides increased 35%…The analysis of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention data found the increases for these three “deaths of despair” combined were higher than for Baby Boomers and senior citizens.

It’s also worth noting that mental illness, drug and alcohol deaths are higher in certain states than others, and within those states, higher in areas which are struggling economically and offer less hope for the future.

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again – the rise of mental illness and suicides goes deeper than brain function and chemistry. We now live in a society where young adults – and younger – are losing hope and increasingly turning to substance abuse to cope. This portends poorly for the future.

What’s the solution? Part of it, of course, has to involve dealing with mental health. As I’ve written about in the past, there is a critical need for more mental health practitioners, fairer insurance practices and targeted programs which seek to destroy mental health stigma. These are answers which I often gravitate towards, as they’re public policy related. They have been studied. There are best practices with answers that, while maybe not “concrete,” can reasonably be expected to make a difference in the problem.

The truth – the full solution – is far more complicated than that.

If we’re using phrases like “deaths of despair” in casual conversation, something is fundamentally broken in our society. We now have entire generations of young adults and kids who are growing up in a world that they simply cannot handle. It goes deeper than mental health, and while all the solutions above that I mentioned are real, they can only address a problem after it has arisen. The preferential way of dealing with deaths of despair is to stop someone from ever reaching that point.

What’s causing these deaths? My random musings, based on available research and the commentary of those far smarter than me: An economy which leaves too many Americans out in the cold, smothering student loan debt, an overwhelming degree of information which leads to a pervasive sense of hopelessness about current affairs and the state of our planet, technology which gives the illusion of connections while pulling us further apart, overwhelming demands on our limited time and resources, a lack of physical activity…I mean, where do you want to start or stop?

The whole concept behind “deaths of despair” are instructive in my mind, because they make it clear that depression is about so much more than mental health. It’s about the state of the family, the economy, the world, and we’re never going to be able to adequately get our arms around this problem without dealing with it holistically.

I wish I could answer in an upbeat way, but this concept is terrifying. We’re poisoning the well, and it’s up to all of us to try to change the universe in which we live to make it a better place, not just for ourselves, or for our family, but for everyone on this planet.

The Canary in the Coal Mine: Mental Illness in College Students

NPR has great article on the mental health “epidemic” in colleges, inspired by The Stressed Years of Their Lives by Dr. Anthony Rostain, which looks at the mental health crisis among college students.

College students, like other demographics, are seeing major increases in mental illnesses. Among the rather depressing (no pun intended) statistics:

  • 44% of college students report symptoms of depression, but 75% of those students do not seek help.
  • Suicide is the 3rd leading cause of death among college students.
  • 80% of students report that they feel stressed on a daily basis.
  • 9% contemplated suicide in the past year.

Why is this jump so acute among college students? In the NPR interview, Dr. Rostain notes that there are a variety of new stresses an impacts on college students today, including a post 9/11 world, the remnants of the great recession, the rise of social media, school shootings, etc. These have all led to an explosion in depression and anxiety, as has the increased pressures which college students face to succeed.

Speaking broadly, I think, unfortunately, that this rise in mental illness among college students is reflective of what is to come. We know that mental illness rates are rising across the board – but we also know that those increases are sharpest among young adults, and sharper still among the youngest of those surveyed.

This has potentially devastating implications as this generation continues to shift into the real world and the workplace. Combine this with the rapidly exploding shortage of mental health practitioners, and the unabated rise of suicides…and we’ve got a big problem. One which will dramatically effect all of our lives.

Fundamentally, I continue to believe that this is a problem which goes well beyond the boundaries of normal public policy. There are things we absolutely must do to expand treatment, access and affordability so that Americans can get the help they need and deserve, no question. But we have to ask ourselves the broader questions: What is causing this rise of depression and anxiety?

These are real issues, and important questions, and ones which must be addressed if we are ever to truly be able to reduce the rates of mental illness and stress which are so prevalent in modern society today. Do I have the answers? Hell no. But I know it’s a question we have to ask.

Bringing this back to where we started: We shouldn’t look at the rising rates of mental illness in college students as something which is occurring in isolation or among a generation which simply hasn’t entered the real world. Given the rise of mental illness across the board, and particularly among young adults, we have to acknowledge that rising mental illness rates in younger demographics has the potential to effect this entire world. What kind of pressures will my children face? Your grandchildren?

Pay attention to this one. It will effect all of us in the future.

 

The biggest reason it’s so hard to find a mental health practitioner

We don’t have enough of them.

As I run around in my real job discussing mental health, I consistently come back to this one central truth: The biggest issue in the area of mental health is that we simply do not have enough people to provide care, or who take Medicare or Medicaid. This means that, when you call a psychologist or psychiatrist, the most likely response is, “I’m sorry, but the Doctor is not accepting patients at this time.”

Consider this: According to a 2016 study, the supply of mental health practitioners by 2025 is expected to be 250,000 short. This disturbing trend is occurring despite the fact that rates of mental illness and suicide continue to increase, and increase alarmingly among the youngest members of our society.

Interestingly, the above article notes that a big part for the rise in demand of mental health practitioners has been a lessening of the stigma which surrounds mental health. As more people become more comfortable with seeking treatment, they put a greater strain on the need for mental health providers.

The problem is particularly bad in rural areas, where, according to this 2018 CNN article, “a majority of non-metropolitan counties (65%) do not have a psychiatrist and almost half of non-metropolitan counties (47%) do not have a psychologist.” This shortage contributes to higher rates of mental illness, addiction, and suicide in rural communities. Indeed, it helps explain why rural areas typically have higher suicide rates than their urban counterparts.

So, what can we do about this?

I’d argue the biggest challenge is the need to increase mental health reimbursement rates, which are historically lower for mental health services. These low rates typically steer prospective doctors away from mental health specialties and into more lucrative practice areas like cardiology and oncology. Increasing these rates would help recruit more practitioners.

Additional funding is also needed for recruitment and loan forgiveness programs. Many states – including Pennsylvania – have begun enacting these programs in an effort to increase access.

Private practitioners and hospital systems also need to step up their game when it comes to this area, but according to the article above, the good news is that they are doing just that. I know that both of the major health networks in my area have said they are looking to expand capacity and recruitment when it comes to psychologists and psychiatrists, and they aren’t the only ones

If you are interested in the interaction between mental health and public policy, you really should pay attention to this space. There will be a lot more in this area in teh next few years.

Mental health resources when you need advice, support or just to feel like you aren’t alone

A not-so-stunning mental health truism for you now: You don’t have all the answers. Neither do I. Neither do any of us. But together, we can maybe discover the truth, or at least lend support.

Depression, and mental illness in general, are fantastic tricksters. They make you think that you are alone, that you are unworthy of support and of love. That isn’t the case, of course. No matter who you are, you are intrinsically worthy of support, kindness and love. But depression makes you think otherwise – makes you think that you are weak and unworthy of all the good things in this world.

On moments where you feel that way, the best thing you can do is talk to someone who loves you or cares about you. Short of that – or in addition to it – there is the internet. I can’t believe I just wrote that sentence, but yes, the internet and some of its kinder corners can actually be incredibly valuable when it comes to finding support for your own issues or illnesses.

For example, have you been to The Mighty? It’s a website with forums and resources for a whole slew of topics – everything from disability to mental illness to other diseases. It’s a great community with good information, and more importantly, other people who are there for you and each other.

I’ve written in the past about Reddit, but that entry was more about how hilarious it can be and just make you smile. Reddit does have a dark side – but it also has a wonderfully supportive segments. Subreddits about depression, depression help or just for people looking for a self confidence boost are filled with supportive people.

If done right, mental health forums can be a great place to trade information, provide support and receive it. To that end, make sure to check out some of the better ones, including at PsychCentral, NAMI and Mental Health America.

Looking for real medical advice? Check out WebMD, The Mayo Clinic or the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. These websites have scientifically-based information which can help you get a better idea of your symptoms and where you can find help. And, speaking of finding help, you can always check out Psychology Today’s Therapist Finder.

Also, cute puppy videos. Cause why not.

Look, I’m sure this goes without saying, but the internet is not a cure all for your pain. But it can at least get you moving in the right direction and thinking about better days ahead.

So, yes, go on the internet. See what you can find to help you get through this dark moment. That’s one of the many good things you can find there!