How Gun Control Can Help Stop Suicides

When people who oppose gun control don’t want to say, “Hey, yeah, I think that we should allow ordinary citizens to own ballistic weapons without so much as a background check,” they don’t do that. Instead, they say, “We shouldn’t focus on gun control – we should focus on mental health.” It’s a lovely political pivot from a group of people who don’t want to actually focus on things which will stop gun deaths.

Related: They then do less than nothing to help people with mental illness.

I’ve attacked that argument before, but now I’d like to add to it: Gun control measures – and specifically Red Flag laws – can help stop suicides.

What is a “Red Flag Law”?

A “Red Flag Law” – also known as an Emergency Risk Protective Order – is a formal court proceeding. They vary from state to state but have the same characteristics: If a person is making threats or found to be a danger to themselves or others, someone (such as a family member or police officer) can petition the Court to have an individual’s guns temporarily removed from their possession. They’ve been promulgated as an effort to stop mass shootings, but the data thus far shows that they are more beneficial in the fight against suicide.

Limiting Access To Deadly Means Stops Suicide

Multiple studies and historical experience have proved it – if you limit someone’s access to the means of suicide, you can reduce suicides. And that is precisely why Red Flag laws are so important for reducing suicides. If crafted appropriately, a red flag law can result in the removal of a gun from someone who may hurt themselves with it.

So, yes. Here’s an area where we can help mental illness – but it’s via sane gun control measures.

Red flag laws are relatively new, so the research on them is somewhat limited. But, from what’s available, they work. For example, take a look at the experience of states like Indiana and Connecticut, which enacted red flag laws relatively recently:

“In Indiana, after the enactment of the law [in 2005], we saw a 7.5 percent decrease in firearms suicides in the 10 years that followed,” Kivisto said. “We didn’t see any notable increase or decrease in non-firearms suicide.”

“And so when we looked at it from 2007 and beyond [in Connecticut], [gun suicides] decreased by 13.7 percent,” Kivisto said.

This furthers the idea that access to deadly means can help control for suicide.

Suicide is a massive societal problem, one which belies simple solutions, involves multiple areas of public policy and will require significant investment to truly tackle. That being said, some small laws can make a big difference, and reducing access to suicidal means can do just that.

Mental illness and gun violence are barely related – it’s just a convenient scapegoat for cowards

As you know, it was a bloody week in America, with a massacre in El Paso and Dayton leaving 22 and 9 dead, respectably. It’s been another awful year in America when it comes to mass shootings – 255 in 217 days by August 5.

As can be anticipated at moments like these, Democrats and Republicans turned to their expected policy solutions to stop the bloodshed. Democrats argued for stronger gun control laws, including reinstating assault weapons bans and Emergency Protective Orders which could get the guns out of the hands of those who seek to use them to kill people or hurt themselves. Republicans tried to pivot to mental health and argue that the problem is just too dang complex to solve. In a speech after the shootings, President Trump said, “Mental illness and hatred pulls the trigger, not the gun” (whatever that means).

Other Republicans echoed these comments. Ohio Senator Rob Portman said, “Look at the mental health crisis in our country today, there aren’t enough laws…” South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham said:

Here’s the thing – the whole argument that this is a mental health problem, not a gun problem – is rank, stinking bullshit.

I’ll start by quoting those who make the argument far more eloquently than I ever could. In a blistering press release which gained national attention, Dr. Arthur Evans, CEO of the American Psychological Association, blasted the notion that perpetrators of mental illness were behind the spike in mass shootings. Said Dr. Evans:

Blaming mental illness for the gun violence in our country is simplistic and inaccurate and goes against the scientific evidence currently available.

“The United States is a global outlier when it comes to horrific headlines like the ones that consumed us all weekend. Although the United States makes up less than 5% of the world’s population, we are home to 31% of all mass shooters globally, according to a CNN analysis. This difference is not explained by the rate of mental illness in the U.S.

“The one stark difference? Access to guns…

As we psychological scientists have said repeatedly, the overwhelming majority of people with mental illness are not violent. “

Evans went on to say that America desperately needs more gun control.

Former Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton also chimed in with a similar comment:

Indeed, experts have repeatedly blasted the notion that mental illness is tied to a rise in mass shootings. According to Adam Lankford, a University of Alabama criminologist who reviewed gun violence in 171 countries, access to guns is a far better predictor of gun violence than mental illness. The Secret Service has said, “Mental illness, alone, is not a risk factor” for predicting violence. The Washington Post notes that, in a 2018 analysis, 25% of active shooters had some sort of mental illness. A 2015 study on the same subject had that number at 22%.

This notion that it’s the mentally ill are the perpetrators of mass shootings is, generally speaking, unmitigated crap. Indeed, multiple studies have shown that the mentally ill are far more likely TO BE VICTIMS of violence, and gun violence – not the perpetrators of it. According to one study, the mentally ill are 3.6 times more likely to carry out an act of violence than the general population, but 23 times more likely to be that victim. The same study said that the vast majority of violent behavior occurs “due to factors other than mental illness.”

But hey, why let a good soundbite get in the way of avoiding a solution to a problem, right?

Oh. And one more thing. Republicans in Congress and at the state level have said that this is a mental health problem. So, naturally, they want to address it by increasing funding and access for people who suffer from mental illness, right?

Hahahaha.

President Trump and his Republican allies spent the first two years of his Presidency trying to eviscerate the Affordable Care Act, which has done a few little things for mental health care, you know, like improve access and reduce costs for people with mental illness…small stuff, I guess….

Let’s stop the bullshit: Trying to blame gun violence on the mentally ill is a convenient excuse for those who don’t want to actually deal with gun control. It’s not based in reality. And the rhetoric certainly isn’t matched up by the actions taken when it comes to improving mental health care.

Be smarter than they think you are. Don’t fall for this lie.

 

How mass shootings affect (everyone else’s) mental health

It’s Sunday morning as I type this, the day after a bloody day in America. Unless you live under a rock, you know why.

20 dead in El Paso, Texas.

9 dead in Dayton, Ohio.

The elected official in me – indeed, the human – is outraged. 29 dead YESTERDAY ALONE in mass shootings because America refuses, collectively, to take the policy steps necessary to deal with these tragedies. To act on responsible violence-protection measures which could stop this bloodshed. To condemn white supremacy as a society and rid ourselves of it, root and branch. To adequately fund mental health initiatives which could save lives.

Our cowardice will condemn us all.

Alright. That’s not even the rage-fueled reason I’m writing today, although Lord knows that I could go on for hours about it, and that people much smarter and eloquent than me can and are doing the same. The reason I’m writing today was inspired by this tweet:

Two thoughts: First, this is beyond awful. Second, yes. How many of us have had similar thoughts? You’re just at the mall with family and friends, having a grand old time, and suddenly brought out of your pleasant state by wondering, “Hey, if there’s a shooting, what do I do?”

These thoughts are disturbing, intrusive, unpleasant, and slightly necessary. While the odds of any of us actual being involved in a mass shooting remain low (despite the rise in recent years), the possibility always exists, and it makes sense for all of us to be prepared and aware of the potential danger.

But society has now evolved to the point where, to an extent, we are all wondering about mass shootings. Every time I drop my kids off at school, I wonder about it. It’s in the back of my head, and depending on world events or my mood, it may be front and center. How many of you feel the same?

I would never claim that the pain of any of us not involved in a shooting like this is anywhere near the trauma of someone who was directly involved, so please don’t misunderstand. But, the elected official in me wants to make sure that we are clear about the damage that guns are doing to ALL OF US in society, and that they have changed the way we live in America to a constant state of fear and, as the tweet above puts it, a “low level anxiety.”

I can think of at least two broad and real examples. First, to those of us who are already prone to anxiety/stress and already likely thinking the worst, it gets your guard upon a near constant, low-level basis. It gives you a very real fear to focus on, and that, in turn, can pull you out of a sense of joy or relaxation you are feeling.

Second, and I’d say more damaging, is the impact these mass shootings has on kids. I was speaking with a group of guidance counselors a few weeks ago, and they were telling me how many students they speak with – on a regular basis – who are terrified that they will become a victim of a mass shooting. Again, as bad as things are in America, the odds of that happening are still low. However, the rise in shootings, the nature of our interconnected world and the ubiquity of technology magnify the odds of this occurring. This is particularly true for children or teenagers who don’t have the skills to know that the odds of this happening are still relatively slim. As a result, kids are scared to go to public, safe places – and this includes schools. What kind of damage will this have on them as they grow? As they attempt to learn or find safety and comfort?

We don’t have to live this way. And if we’re ever going to find the courage to actually not live this way, we have to acknowledge the impacts which gun violence has on every member of society, beyond those who are directly effected. The touches everyone of us.