Does hypnosis help – long term – with depression and anxiety?

All of us who suffer are constantly on the lookout for alternative ways to cope with depression and anxiety. As I was putzing around on Facebook the other day, the thought occurred to me: Is hypnosis one of those methods?

I’ve written in the past about the benefits of trying to relax throughout the day. One such way I’ve done so is by listening to ASMR videos, even if they are just running in the background. I’ve also always found guided relaxation videos/tapes to be very calming, and again, that sort of inspired this particular entry for me.

First, let’s review what hypnosis is, and what it isn’t. Hypnosis will not make you cluck like a chicken. It will not train you to become an assassin. It will not make you do anything you don’t want to do.

Hypnosis – true hypnosis, not the exaggerated, movie kind – is defined as heightened concentration, focus and openness to suggestions. While it is often associated with going into a state of deep relaxation, it is not to be confused with going into a coma-like state. Hypnosis patients are fully aware of what is going on, they are just put into a more relaxed state.

I did a little bit of digging about the available research when it comes to depression, anxiety and hypnosis. Healthline refers to hypnosis as a “complimentary therapy” which can be used to treat depression with minimal side effects, but cautions that it shouldn’t be the only type of therapy which a person uses. WebMD does the same, while noting that hypnotherapy can be used for the purposes of suggesting new (and more productive behaviors) or analyzing past traumas. However, both pages noted that hypnotherapy can be associated with the process of implanting false memories – as such, it should be avoided by people who may be sustainable to those, like individuals who suffer from dissociative disorders. Meanwhile, the Anxiety and Depression Association of America goes more in-depth in terms of how hypnosis can compliment cognitive behavioral therapy, describing how hypnosis can be used to generate images about what someone wants or needs.

In terms of specific research, I found a couple of papers. One 2010 study noted that there was a relative “dearth” of actual research on hypnosis’ effect on depression and anxiety, but that it was easy to imagine, conceptually, how hypnosis could be helpful for these disorders. Most interesting is a 2016 study, which made the rather startling claim that hypnotherapy was actually more effective than Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. That’s…interesting. It’s a finding that I’d argue would have to be replicated in order to be believed, but that’s quite the claim!

If nothing else, again – I think hypnotherapy can be deeply relaxing. Guided imagery (a process similar to hypnotherapy) can be effective for relaxing and for stopping anxiety attacks in their tracks. Heck, I remember my therapist once designing a guided imagery recording for me. So yeah, I think hypnotherapy can be useful – when done by a licensed therapist and in conjunction with any other medical professional you may have.

What about you – any experiences with hypnotherapy, positive or negative? Let us know in the comments!