4 Quick Tips to Break You Out Of Your Funk

My wife and I spent a lot of time this summer at the our local parks. We’re lucky – we live in Allentown, and we have this ridiculous park system. One of the closest to our house – and the largest – is Trexler Park, a gorgeous park with a lake, ample green space and a few paths. Every night last week, we’ve grabbed the kids and hopped down to Trexler. It’s been wonderful.

And I always feel better when we get back.

Look, one of the many problems with depression is that it totally locks you in. You do the same things because you simply do not have the time or mental energy to do anything else. That, of course, can only lead to more depression issues, and that’s something which you have to try and break if you’re ever going to make a recovery.

There are ways, however. The next time you feel stuck, consider doing any of these 5 activities.

Go to the park

Forget your troubles, try to forget everything. Go for a nice walk and lose yourself in nature.

Yes, this does help – and there’s research to prove it. It’s 8am on Sunday as I am writing this, and I just took the dog for a walk around my nearly deserted block. It felt so nice. The best way I can describe how I feel is more centered.

Volunteer at a nearby animal shelter

Our family just adopted a pupper again, and it’s been very nice so far. We took our time making the selection from the Lehigh County Humane Society, and one of the things which struck me when we were there was that they had a slew of volunteers walking in and out of that place, caring for the animals, taking them for walks, etc.

Look, puppies and kitties are more than just adorable: They help you fight depression. Combine that with the general mental health benefits of volunteering, and this one is well worth it. If you’re an animal person, go check out your local shelter and see what volunteer options there are.

Exercise

I’ve written about this one before so I am repeating myself, but exercise when you are depressed can be very beneficial, and again, there’s research to prove it. Depression is fundamentally biological, and exercise can change your biology and physiology, making you feel better.

Take care of yourself

When I think of myself in my most depressed state, it’s this: Covered in a hoodie, unshowered, hair uncombed and unshaven. Sound familiar? When you’re depressed, you lack the energy or mental strength to do even the most basic things, like take care of general hygiene. That, of course, is largely a mental trick, but it works both ways. Doing something small – even if it’s just brushing your teeth -can signal to your body that this is not where you want to be right now. So, to that end, when you’re down, make sure you take care of your body. Do the basics – shave and comb your hair. If you don’t think you have strength for that, try something small – take a warm shower. Try to fool your body into thinking you are okay – and then look the part.

These are four things which work for me and others, but they may not for you. What does work for you? Let us know in the comments!

 

Depressed? Try volunteering

I caught this article on Motherboard and it really, really got me thinking.  The article itself is certainly worth the read, but I’ll try to summarize the points and add my own spin on it.

The article notes that volunteering helps with depression.  This happens a few different ways:

  • First, there are mental and physical benefits to volunteering.  Volunteering can lower blood pressure, reduce the risk of hypertension and make you physically feel better.  This happens, in part, by noting that oxytocin (feel good brain chemical) gets released when you regularly volunteer.
  • Volunteering helps you keep things in perspective.  It gets much harder to be depressed when you are working with someone much less fortunate than you.  I’ve always found this to be a helpful strategy, to be honest: On moments when you are depressed, compare yourself to someone who has it worse than you.
  • Volunteering gives you social connections and social interaction, a challenge for people who are depressed.

It’s actually the second point that I want to talk about more than anything else, because that’s something I’ve always found to be powerful: Volunteering gets you out of your own head.  Let me point back to a blog entry I made some time ago about depression and rumination: Thinking obsessively about yourself, and your own problems, can be tied very strongly to depression.

That’s where volunteering can come in.  Not only are you exposed to people in legitimately worse situations than you, but it can help you out of your own head, as it is much harder to think about yourself when you are trying to help others.  Sometimes, your brain needs that extra kick in the butt to stop the thoughts of yourself.  And that’s where volunteering can come in.  According to the article, there is no volunteering that is better than others – doing good means feeling good.

I do want to add one clarification here, however: I’ve made volunteering sound like a selfish exercise designed to the volunteer feel better. That’s not the attitude that you should have when you go to do good. Don’t get me wrong, there is nothing wrong with volunteering because you want to feel better and are hoping to build some social connections and make a difference.  But I would remind you that the only way to truly reap the benefits of volunteering is to do so by approaching it from an ultimately selfless perspective.  Go somewhere with the hope of doing good, and the rest of it will fall into place.

As always, I am curious to hear your perspective.  What good experiences have you had with volunteering in the hopes that it will help control depression?  How about negative ones?  I know I’ve felt both ways when volunteering, and I’m curious to hear other perspectives.  Let us know your thoughts in the comments!