Why the idea of a “pill for loneliness” has me nervous

I came across this article in The Guardian: Scientists are apparently working on a pill for loneliness.

The article does a great job of noting a fundamental truth about humans: We are social creatures. When we are denied social interaction with others, we become depressed and lose our ability to function. As a result of societal changes, a changing family and work structure, the increasing business of human life (and more!), humans are spending less and less time with others. We’re spending more and more time by ourselves. This has frightening implications for our ability to function as a society and as individuals.

Loneliness is bad for you. This is something which The Depression Cure concentrates on, and the Guardian article correctly notes:

Loneliness elevates our risk of developing a range of disorders, including cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative diseases, cognitive decline, and metastatic cancer. It also weakens the immune system, making us more susceptible to infections. Left untended, even situational loneliness can ossify into a fixed state that changes brain structures and processes…

The cure, in my opinion, has to start on the individual level. We have to prioritize getting off the damn phone and spending time with others. It is very much within our ability to change our lifestyles and re-prioritize how we use our valuable time. The change won’t be easy, but it will come.

That being said, there’s a “promising” line of research creating medication which would “interfere with the ways loneliness affects the brain and body.” Initial studies have shown that the medication reduces perceptions of loneliness among those who take them.

This has me really, really itchy and uncomfortable.

Look, let me just clarify something: I am very pro-medication for treating depression. I’ve been on anti-depressants for almost half my life and I know that they have saved my life. They’ve given me an ability to function which I never would have had otherwise. Medication, combined with therapy, can give someone their life back.

But, that doesn’t mean that we should default to medication when other options are available.

I’ve taken medication for depression – along with millions of others – because traditional therapy wasn’t enough. I viewed it not as a first resort, but as a second/third one (I wouldn’t even say last because there are more intensive forms of therapy, like ECT). But the notion of someone being lonely and turning to a pill has me uncomfortable because there are less radical options which are relatively easily available. 

People who are lonely can undergo a slew of social efforts in order to meet people. Sometimes, this means making yourself attend classes or events. Other times, this means picking up the phone and calling someone in your social network and redeveloping a preexisting connection. But, more often than not, there are ways to deal with loneliness. That’s why I’m nervous here. We can’t just turn to pills to fix something when there are other solutions available.

I suspect I am not completely understanding this. There is something in the article about how taking the medication can actually help people reconnect with others – loneliness can work like depression in that it can create a “cycle” of loneliness – you get lonely and feel too “stuck” to fix it, so you don’t connect with anyone and you withdraw further from your social circle, and then you get more lonely, etc. I get that. But I fear that a pill to cure loneliness will, in the long run, just make us all more lonely.

This is one of the more controversial things I think I’ve said lately about depression and medication, so I’d be curious to hear what you have to say. Am I right or wrong? Let me know in the comments below!

The danger of Benzodiazepians

If you’ve suffered from any sort of mental health disorder, odds are good you are familiar with Benzodiazepians (aka Benzos). Benzos are a class of drugs which are used to treat anxiety and a slew of other conditions, including insomnia, seizures and more. In the short-term, they can be very helpful in getting people through panic attacks. Personally, I’ve used them in the past for rip-roaring anxiety attacks, and they can be helpful in getting through the worst of these condition. When taken in conjunction with therapy or other long-term medication strategies, they are a useful tool in treating mental illness.

Use of benzos has dramatically increased. From 1996-2013, the amount of adults prescribed benzos increased 67%, going from 8.1 million to 13.5 million. Those increases are also seen among individuals who have been prescribed opioids – and that has led to overdose issues.

According to government research, over 30% of opioid overdoses also involve benzos:

Line graph showing causes of death from opioids, benzodiazepines and opioids, and opioids without benzodiazepines between 1999 and 2015

 

Meanwhile, overdose deaths from Benzos have shown frightening increases of late:

Number of Deaths Involving Benzodiazepines

There is also evidence of late that shows that Benzo prescriptions for those with PTSD may increase suicide risk, and that use of Benzos may be tied to an increased risk of Alzheimer’s.

So, am I telling you to throw away your Benzos? No, no, and hell no. When used under a doctors care, and responsibly, Benzo medication can be an important part of any therapeutic regimen. Candidly, when my anxiety was at it’s peak, I walked around with tranquilizers as a “just in case.” Knowing I had those to fall back on gave me the confidence to continue my daily routine in terms of my school, work and social life. If I hadn’t had those, I would have had major difficulties functioning. Eventually, modifications to my regular medication and therapy helped me address my anxiety issues, ones which (thankfully) have not come back.

Benzos can be helpful – you just need to be careful in how you use them!

PS: GO VOTE TOMORROW!