Teens, marijuana and depression

A friend of mine was kind enough to flag this article for me, and it brings up some points that I really think are worth exploring.

As a debate over legalizing marijuana continues across the country – and in Pennsylvania – a new study draws a connection (not a casualtional one, however) between teen marijuana use and depression.

From the NBC report on the study:

Researchers found that cannabis use during the teenage years was associated with a nearly 40 percent bump in the risk of depression and a 50 percent increase in the risk of suicidal thoughts in adulthood, according to the study, published Wednesday in JAMA Psychiatry.

The report does note that this isn’t to say marijuana causes depression (though that may, in fact, be the case). It’s possible that the depression encourages marijuana use, or that a third factor (such as economics, anxiety, stress, etc) cause both the depression and marijuana use.

Still. The study does show a clear connection between marijuana and depression. There’s an irony to that: Some research shows that medical marijuana may actually help alleviate symptoms of depression. This may be a secondary benefit of medical marijuana, which has been shown to relieve pain and stress – two factors which, of course, may lead to someone becoming depressed.

Can these seemingly contradictory findings be reconciled? Sure. It’s possible that the drugs act in such a way which helps those who are already depressed, but affects other aspects of someone’s brain chemistry in those who are not depressed, thus making them so. It’s also important to note that there are major differences in terms of the chemical composition, and effects, of medical and recreational marijuana, thus potentially resulting in different effects.

The causes and effects of marijuana use are not always clear or linear. More research is needed.

Personally, I believe that marijuana needs to be examined and researched like any other drug. I’ll also note a flaming hypocrisy within our current medical and judicial systems: Numerous legal drugs (such as Oxycontin) are obtainable from reputable medical professionals, despite the fact that Oxycontin is more potent and addictive than marijuana.

Our drug policy in America makes no sense. But – and this is a big “but” – we cannot sit here and pretend that legalizing marijuana is the solution to many of our woes. Legalizing marijuana may be preferable to the alternative of prohibition, but that’s not to say that there won’t be significant negative side effects, and this may very well be depression in young people. Marijuana legalization – it’s pros and cons – need real, comprehensive study and thought. It could have major benefits and harm to the mental illness space.

The danger of Benzodiazepians

If you’ve suffered from any sort of mental health disorder, odds are good you are familiar with Benzodiazepians (aka Benzos). Benzos are a class of drugs which are used to treat anxiety and a slew of other conditions, including insomnia, seizures and more. In the short-term, they can be very helpful in getting people through panic attacks. Personally, I’ve used them in the past for rip-roaring anxiety attacks, and they can be helpful in getting through the worst of these condition. When taken in conjunction with therapy or other long-term medication strategies, they are a useful tool in treating mental illness.

Use of benzos has dramatically increased. From 1996-2013, the amount of adults prescribed benzos increased 67%, going from 8.1 million to 13.5 million. Those increases are also seen among individuals who have been prescribed opioids – and that has led to overdose issues.

According to government research, over 30% of opioid overdoses also involve benzos:

Line graph showing causes of death from opioids, benzodiazepines and opioids, and opioids without benzodiazepines between 1999 and 2015

 

Meanwhile, overdose deaths from Benzos have shown frightening increases of late:

Number of Deaths Involving Benzodiazepines

There is also evidence of late that shows that Benzo prescriptions for those with PTSD may increase suicide risk, and that use of Benzos may be tied to an increased risk of Alzheimer’s.

So, am I telling you to throw away your Benzos? No, no, and hell no. When used under a doctors care, and responsibly, Benzo medication can be an important part of any therapeutic regimen. Candidly, when my anxiety was at it’s peak, I walked around with tranquilizers as a “just in case.” Knowing I had those to fall back on gave me the confidence to continue my daily routine in terms of my school, work and social life. If I hadn’t had those, I would have had major difficulties functioning. Eventually, modifications to my regular medication and therapy helped me address my anxiety issues, ones which (thankfully) have not come back.

Benzos can be helpful – you just need to be careful in how you use them!

PS: GO VOTE TOMORROW!